Lectures

The Remainder of Our Programme For 2019 – 2020

For reasons explained on the ‘Welcome’ page, we have had to abandon our lecture meetings at Kington Langley Village Hall and we are now replacing the remainder of this season with a series of on-line live lectures to take us to the end of the season. Please lookout for email (MailChimp) links to enable you to join us in viewing these lectures.

You can find Lindi’s reviews of past lectures by following the Lectures memo tab.


May, Tuesday 19th, 2020, at 10:45 for 11:00

Raphael of Urbino – An Anniversary Lecture – Siân Walters

2020 is an important year marking the 500th anniversary of Raphael’s death. Join lecturer and Italian Renaissance expert Siân Walters for a celebratory lecture commemorating his life and works. Raphael is often referred to as one of the three giants of the High Renaissance in Italy alongside Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci yet …   more


June, Wednesday 17th, 2020 at 11:00

Beethoven at 250 – Classical Music’s Greatest Revolutionary – Sandy Burnett

To mark the 250th Anniversary of Beethoven’s birth, Sandy guides us through the life of this brilliant, cantankerous visionary and astonishingly original composer, a man who tore up the rule book of classical music. With visual images and examples of his music, Sandy will show us why Beethoven described himself as a ‘poet in sound’.  More …


July, Tuesday 7th, 2020, 11:00

Undressing Antiques – Mark Hill

“Antiques. I don’t understand them and they’re beyond my budget. Nobody even collects anymore. They’re not for me.” A persuasive introduction to buying antiques and integrating and using them in today’s homes. The state of the antiques market and the different meanings of the word ‘value’ are considered, and we take a look at what current and future generations of collectors are buying, why they are buying it and how they are displaying it.

Mark can be seen on the third lecture in the Arts Society Lectures at Home series – The 1960s Revolution in Glass Here. You  can judge for yourself the enthusiasm and personality he puts into his lectures. More…


August, Tuesday 4th, 2020 at 11:00

‘The Dregs of the People Remain’ – The Black Death and its Aftermath – Imogen Corrigan

It is possible to see a shift in artistic tastes following the plague years which began in the mid C14th. This is understandable considering that we now know that certainly 50% and perhaps 60% of the population of Europe and beyond perished in the first wave and that the disease recurred over the next 130 years. More …